Saturday, August 4, 2012

James P. Coleman

The Coleman Family and Their Kin

James P. Coleman
Mary A. McCleland
MRIN 162

 James P. Coleman was a long time resident of the Carrollton City community in Carroll county, Georgia. He was a farmer, blacksmith, and businessman. Born September 1833 in DeKalb county, Georgia, he was the eldest son of Henry Allen Coleman and Sarah Ann Barnes. He moved with his family to Cobb county and was residing there with them in the year 1840. About 1853, he married Mary A. McCleland, daughter of Georgina McLelland and by 1860 had established his residence in the Kansas district of Carroll county. When the War Between The States,(American Civil War), broke out, he enlisted in Company F, 3d Georgia Regiment (State Guards) on 15 Oct 1861 for a six month term of service and at its conclusion, he was honorably discharged near Savannah, GA. on 15 Apr 1862. He then enlisted on 4 Aug 1863 in Company I, 7th Georgia (State Guards) and was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant serving till his term of service expired on 4 Feb 1864 and the unit was disbanded. On 15 Jun 1864, he enlisted in Company B, Glenn's Cavalry, State Troops and served in that unit till its surrender at the end of the war. He was paroled on April 26, 1865. After the war he pursued his business interests in Carrollton and in 1870 he was the owner and proprieter of a jewelry store in Carrollton which he later sold to his brother, W.A. Coleman. About 1880, his wife, Mary A. (McCleland) Coleman died. He appears in the 1880 Federal census as a widower with the occupation of a miller living in the Lowell District of Carroll county. In 1890, he joined his brother,W.A. Coleman, in a joint venture to build a grist mill at Whooping Creek near the present town of Clem, GA. just south of Carrollton. On 2 Oct 1898, he remarried to Mrs. Mary Buran (maiden name Guthrie), a widow, and selling most of his business interests moved to Cobb county where he returned to the occupation of farming. By 1910, he returned to Carroll county making his residence at Clem, Georgia and died in 1915. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity.

Mary A. McCleland, 1st wife of James P. Coleman, was born in 1853 in Georgia. She was the daughter of Georgina McLelland. Not much is known about her except that her brother, William G. McCleland, married James P. Coleman's sister, Sarah Jane Coleman. Mary A. McCleland Coleman died in 1880.  She and James P. Coleman had eight children:

1. Henry McCleland Coleman, b. 1854 in Georgia, married 12 Apr 1876 to E.F. Whittle in Carrollton,GA., d. 16 May 1896 in Modesto, Stanislaus county, California.
2. Mary Elizabeth Coleman, b. 30 Jan 1856 in Alabama, married 15 Mar 1877 to John Henry Jones in Carrollton,GA., d. 1 Jul 1944 in Carroll co.,GA.
3. John William Coleman, known as Will ,b. 1858 in Carroll co.,GA., married on 29 Jan 1880 to Mary Emma Tuggle in Carroll co.,GA.
4. James Thomas Coleman,known as Tom , b. 15 Jan 1860 in Carrollton,GA., married 11 Jan 1882 to Charity Mariah Cox in Carrollton, GA., d. 10 Feb 1941 in Carrollton, GA.
5. Tallulah Lee Coleman, known as Lula, b. Nov 1864 in Georgia, married on 11 Jan 1882 to Francis (Frank) M. Davis in Carroll co.,GA., d. 26 Jun 1955 in Carroll co.,GA.
6. Joseph J. Coleman, b. 1869 in Carroll co.,GA., d. 1870 in Carroll co.,GA.
7. Etta Rowena Coleman, b. 18 Jun 1871 in Carroll co.,GA., married 11 Jan 1893 to William Alonzo McBrayer in Paulding co.,GA., d. 6 May 1939 in Cobb co.,GA.
8. Lottie Virginia Coleman, b. 24 Sep 1875 in Carroll co.,GA., married George Wilson Lumpkin Davenport,
d. 15 Dec 1966 in Macon, Bibb co.,GA.

Mary (Guthrie) Buran
MRIN 148
Mary (Guthrie) Buran, 2d wife of James P. Coleman, was born 22 Jul 1838 in South Carolina and was the daughter of George Guthrie. She married James P. Coleman on 2 Oct 1898 in Carroll co.,GA. No children issued from this marriage. She died 15 Jun 1925 in Clem, Carroll co.,GA. Buried at Mount Pleasant Baptist Church Cemetery, Carroll county, Georgia. No information about her first husband "Buran" has been discovered yet.

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